Gangrene

“No, he thought, wimageshen everything you do, you do too long, and do too late, you can’t expect to find the people still there. The people are all gone now. The party’s over and you are with your hostess now.”

It is true that with suffering comes depth. I used to be ashamed of it, but I know now that without it, I would know very little. I see distances further than I have traveled, which is to say I have earned a certain insight into my fellow human beings.

I feel that way as I reread Hemingway this week. Now that I’m older I understand his stories in ways I could not have as a child in my twenties. I teach children in their twenties and they think they know so much. I suppose I did too. A know-it-all-ripe-fuck who, if I didn’t like it or didn’t understand it, put no value in it. What will our world be like when they’re in charge? How could it be worse than the world we’ve created? I think what most of us don’t understand is that everything we do today creates a very specific kind of future. Regrets are inevitable because we’re so stupid in our youth.

Harry is left with his wife and memories of all of the things he did not write. His end is fitting, gangrene from an infection that started with a scratch he was too proud to do clean and bandage. Nothing noble in that, in spite of all his bravado. The truth outs in the end. And the gangrene a symbol for all he did not do and will never do. That’s what it’s like when we fail to live up to our potential. Something I fear. Something that drives me. Something that breathes down my neck like my own mortality.

Breaking News: Auguste Rodin Hides Out In Los Angeles

municipal_artLos Angeles hides her secrets well, especially on a quiet Thursday in July. Atop a hill, facing the Hollywood sign sits Barnsdall Park, an unassuming place often taken for granted by those who know it and invisible to those who don’t. A thick canopy of trees shades walkways and tiny wrought iron tables and chairs perfect for a picnic for two. There’s a theatre, a building where kids learn how to paint, and its crown jewel, the Los Angeles Municipal Arts Museum Gallery—a cumbersome name for such an elegant and modern space. Continue reading “Breaking News: Auguste Rodin Hides Out In Los Angeles”

Salon: 5 Reasons Chris Christie Might Be Lying

5 Reasons Chris Christie Might Be Lyingchris_christie8-620x412

In January, following Chris Christie’s initial press conference I wrote this article for Salon and based my findings in a book called Liespotting, Proven Techniques To Detect Deception, by Pamela Meyer. It won Editor’s Pick, trended for over a week and earned me a Spotlight appearance on The Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell.

MSNBC: Is Chris Christie Lying? The Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell

n_lw_4christie_130113MSNBC, Is Chris Christie Lying? The Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell

Following my popular article for Salon, The 5 Reasons Chris Christie Might Be Lying, I was invited to speak in a Spotlight segment for MSNBC’s The Last Word With Lawrence O’Donnell.

 

Salon: “The Internship” Teaches Gen Xers To Get Along With millennials

internship1-620x412“The Internship” Teaches Gen Xers To Get Along With millennials

In an Arts and Culture piece I wrote for Salon, I analyzed the real life ways that Gen Xers and millennials interact in the work place and explored the ways in which the film offers insight that might improve the relationship between the two generations.